Are Priests and Churches Protected by statutes of limitations for child sex abuse crimes?

In a growing national epidemic of clergy abuse highlighted by news headlines almost every day, we have to examine the laws that apply to child sex abuse.

Nearly all sex abuse crimes are felonies. Felonies carry a much higher level of penalties than misdemeanors, it doesn’t matter if you are a priest, father, clergy member, nun or sister all will face the laws according to the state where the abuse happened.

Different states have different laws covering sex abuse and many times the statutes of limitations (SOL) must be met also vary.  Some states require the victim to report the crime to law enforcement for the statute of limitations “clock” to begin running.  So for these states, when a victim doesn’t report the crime within a certain time frame, the state will shorten or restrict the statute of limitations.  The state is determined based on where the abuse occurred, not where the victim currently lives.

What options does a clergy/priest sex abuse victim have legally?

When someone comes forth in a clergy sex abuse case the victim has two options. One, they can make a police report and seek criminal charges on the priest or two, sue in civil court for damages.

Some state laws have no statute of limitations for criminally prosecuting someone for having sexual contact or intercourse with a minor under the age of 13.  For a sexual assault against a minor under the age of 16, the alleged crime can be prosecuted until the victim reaches the age of 45. statutes of limitations for child sex abuse

Now we are seeing changes being applied to state laws that will increase the age of victim to 55 years old and younger, these states include New York, New Jersey, California and Pennsylvania.

The states that should follow suit in setting victims age to 55 or younger are; Illinois, Minnesota, District of Columbia, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, Hawaii, Maryland, Arizona, Montana and Vermont.

This is a welcome enhancement of the statute of limitations by these states, since more clergy abuse victims are coming out that are older.

State by State Guide on Statutes of Limitations for Clergy / Priest Sex Abuse

It’s interesting to see how the various states deal with statute of limitations on sex crimes, some are much more harsh then others. It can be a bit complicated to absorb all of these laws in one post, however the following is a helpful summation of the current state laws.

We will update this chart as states update their sex crimes statute of limitations, so be sure to book mark this post.

Statutes of Limitation
StatesCitationExtended SOLSummary
AlabamaAla. Code § 6-2-38Alabama has no special statute of limitations. The Alabama Supreme Court has refused to adopt a discovery rule or any provision to repressed memory claims. Claims must be brought within two years of the date of the injury under Alabama Code § 6-2-38.
AlaskaAlaska Stat. § 09.10.060.
Alaska Stat. § 09.10.140.
Alaska Stat. § 09.10.065.
Alaska has no statute of limitations for felony sexual abuse. However, under AS 09.10.065, a person may bring an action at any time for felony sexual abuse of a minor, or felony sexual assault. Also, Alaska has a delayed discovery/realization statute. AS § 09.10.140. Discovery is defined as when “the plaintiff discovered or through use of reasonable diligence should have discovered that the act caused the injury or condition.”.
ArizonaYes, Minority TollingArizona does not have a special statute of limitations for childhood sexual abuse. However, in certain cases, it has applied it statutory minority and disability “unsound mind” (Arizona Statutes § 12-502) tolling provisions to the general tort statute (Arizona Statutes § 12-542) of limitations.
ArkansasArk. Stat. Ann. § 16-56-130(a).YesArkansas civil claims must be filed within three years of the discovery of childhood sexual abuse.
CaliforniaCa. Civ. Penal Code 803 (4) (A)
Ca. Civ. Proc. Code § 340.1
YesSB 813, Leyva. Sex offenses: statute of limitations.

Existing law generally requires that the prosecution of a felony sex offense be commenced within 10 years after the commission of the offense. Under existing law, prosecution for the crimes of rape, sodomy, lewd or lascivious acts, continuous sexual abuse of a child, oral copulation, and sexual penetration, if committed against a victim who was under 18 years of age, may be commenced at any time prior to the victim’s 40th birthday. Existing law allows prosecution of an offense punishable by death or by imprisonment for life or for life without the possibility of parole, or for the embezzlement of public money, to be commenced at any time.

 

This bill would allow the prosecution of rape, sodomy, lewd or lascivious acts, continuous sexual abuse of a child, oral copulation, and sexual penetration, that are committed under certain circumstances, as specified, to be commenced at any time. The bill would apply to these crimes committed after Jan. 1, 2017, and to crimes for which the statute of limitations that was in effect prior to Jan. 1, 2017, has not run as of Jan. 1, 2017.
This bill would incorporate changes to Section 803 of the Penal Code proposed by both this bill and SB 1088, which would become operative only if both bills are enacted and become effective on or before Jan. 1, 2017, and this bill is chaptered last.

 

SEC. 3. Section 803 of the Penal Code is amended to read: (4) (A) In a criminal investigation involving any of the crimes listed in paragraph (1) committed against a child, when the applicable limitations period has not expired, that period shall be tolled from the time a party initiates litigation challenging a grand jury subpoena until the end of the litigation, including any associated writ or appellate proceeding, or until the final disclosure of evidence to the investigating or prosecuting agency, if that disclosure is ordered pursuant to the subpoena after the litigation.

Civ. Proc. Code 340.1 Effective Jan. 1, 2003. The new law provides that actions for the recovery of damages suffered as a result of childhood sexual abuse may be commenced on or after the victim’s 26th birthday if the person or entity against whom the action is commenced knew, had reason to know, or was otherwise on notice, of any unlawful sexual conduct by an employee, volunteer, representative, or agent, and failed to take reasonable steps, and implement reasonable safeguards, to avoid future acts of unlawful sexual conduct. Additionally, under certain circumstances, a cause of action solely for those claims listed above may be revived for a period of one (1) year. All California victims, regardless of age, have one (1) year from Jan. 1, 2003, within which to bring a civil suit.

ColoradoColo. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 16-5-401YesConcerning extending the Criminal Statute of Limitations for sexual assault to 20 years.

(a.7) (I) EXCEPT AS OTHERWISE PROVIDED IN PARAGRAPH (a) OF SUBSECTION (1) OF THIS SECTION PERTAINING TO SEX OFFENSES AGAINST CHILDREN AND EXCEPT AS OTHERWISE PROVIDED IN PARAGRAPHS (a.3) AND (a.5) OF THIS SUBSECTION (8), THE PERIOD OF TIME DURING WHICH AN ADULT PERSON OR JUVENILE MAY BE PROSECUTED SHALL BE TWENTY YEARS AFTER THE COMMISSION OF THE OFFENSE OR DELINQUENT ACT AS TO ANY OFFENSE OR DELINQUENT ACT CHARGED AS A FELONY UNDER SECTION 18-3-402,C.R.S., OR AS CRIMINAL ATTEMPT, CONSPIRACY, OR SOLICITATION TO COMMIT A FELONY UNDER SECTION 18-3-402, C.R.S.

ConnecticutConn. Gen. Stat. § 52-577dYesConnecticut has no common law discovery provision. The existing special statute allows action within 30 years from the date the victim reached the “age of majority.”
DelawareDel. Code tit. 10, § 8145

 

Del. Code tit. 10, § 8119

YesClaims must be brought within 2 years from the date of the injury.

Sb 29 (§8145) was introduced on Jan. 25, 2007. It is an act to amend title 10 of the Delaware Code by removing the statute of limitations for civil suits relating to child sexual abuse and adding related provisions regarding such suits. The bill, now chapter 102, was signed by the Governor July 10, 2007.

District of ColumbiaD.C. Code § 12-301
D.C. Code § 12-302 (a)(1)
YesClaims must be brought within three years “from the time the right to maintain the action accrues.” If the victim is a minor when the injury occurs, he or she may bring the action within three years of his or her 18th birthday.
FloridaFla. Stat. § 95.11(7)

 

House Bill 133, Chapter 2015-133

s. 775.15 Time limitations; general time limitations; exceptions.

 YesClaims founded on alleged abuse, or incest, may be commenced at any time within seven years after the age of majority, or within four years after the injured person leaves the dependency of the abuser, or within four years from the time of discovery by the injured party of both the injury and the causal relationship between the injury and the abuse, whichever occurs later. “For intentional torts based on abuse.”

The bill provides that the act may be cited as the “43 Days Initiative Act.” It amends the statute of limitation law, s. 775.15, F.S., by extending the current statute of limitation time period for a first or second-degree felony sexual battery when the victim is 16 years of age or older and does not report the crime within 72 hours. The bill provides a statute of limitation of 8 years for these offenses instead of the previous 3 or 4 year time period. Under the bill, if a 16-year-old or older victim of second-degree felony sexual battery or an 18-year-old or older victim of first-degree felony sexual battery report the crime within 72 hours, current law is applicable and there is no time limitation for bringing a prosecution. The bill applies to any such offense except one already time-barred on or before July 1, 2015, meaning it applies retroactively to previously committed offenses as long as the statute of limitation has not run on these offenses prior to July 1, 2015.

GeorgiaGa. Code § 9-3-33.1

 

2015 House Bill 17, Act 97

Chapter 3 of Title 9 and Article 2 of Chapter 5 of Title 49

 Yes§ 17-3-2.2.  Statute of limitations—In addition to any periods excluded pursuant to Code Section 17-3-2, if the victim is a person who is 65 years of age or older, the applicable period within which a prosecution must be commenced under Code Section 17-3-1 or other applicable statute shall not begin to run until the violation is reported to or discovered by a law enforcement agency, prosecuting attorney, or other governmental agency, whichever occurs earlier. Such law enforcement agency or other governmental agency shall promptly report such allegation to the appropriate prosecuting attorney. Except for prosecutions for crimes for which the law provides a statute of limitations longer than 15 years, prosecution shall not commence more than 15 years after the commission of the crime.

(I) Part 2 of Article 3 of Chapter 12 of Title 16. 64 (2) Notwithstanding Code Section 9-3-33, any civil action for recovery of damages suffered as a result of childhood sexual abuse committed on or after July 1, 2015, shall be commenced on or before the date the plaintiff attains the age of 53. (d)(1) It is the express intent of the General Assembly that for a period of two years following July 1, 2015, plaintiffs of any age who were time-barred from filing a civil  action for injuries resulting from childhood sexual abuse due to the expiration of the statute of limitations in effect on June 30, 2015, shall be permitted to file such actions  before July 1, 2017, thereby reviving those civil actions which had lapsed or technically expired under the law in effect on June 30, 2015.

Relates to limitations of actions and child abuse and deprivation records, respectively, so as to extend the statute of limitations for actions for childhood sexual abuse; to provide for a short title; to provide for limitations of liability for certain legal entities; to change provisions relating to tolling of limitations for a minor’s cause of action; to change provisions relating to the tolling of limitations for tort actions while criminal prosecution is pending; to change provisions relating to the confidentiality and use of certain records; to provide for related matters; to provide for an effective date; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes.

Guam2011 Guam Public Law 33-31Abolishes altogether the statute of limitations for the criminal prosecution of perpetrators of sex crimes against children.
HawaiiHawaii Rev. Stat. § 657-7Yes, Minority TollingGeneral limitations period for injuries is two years.
IdahoIdaho Code § 6-1704YesSuit may be brought within five years of the victim reaching the age of majority. The statute is only applicable to cases arising after its effective date, July 1, 1989.
IllinoisIll. Rev. Stat. ch. 735, § 13–202.2(b) YesIllinois has a special statute of limitations for survivors of childhood sexual abuse. As amended in 2003, Illinois Statutes § 13–202.2(b) provides: An action for damages for personal injury based on childhood sexual abuse must be commenced within 10 years of the date the victim discovers that the act of childhood sexual abuse occurred and that the injury was caused by the childhood sexual abuse.
IndianaInd. Code § 34-11-2-4 

 

2015 Senate Bill 94, Act 94

YesGeneral statute of limitations requires that any action for injuries to the person must be filed within two years of the time when the cause of action accrues, but before the child becomes 31 years of age. §§ 34-10-2-5 prohibits suits based on injuries that transpire in childhood unless brought within two years of the child reaching 18.

Provides that a rape charge otherwise barred by the statute of limitations may be brought within five years of the time that: (1) the state first discovers DNA evidence sufficient to charge the offender; (2) the state first becomes aware of the existence of a recording that provides evidence sufficient to charge the offender; or (3) a person confesses to the offense.

IowaIowa Code § 614.8A YesPursuant to Iowa statutory law and case law, victims must commence their lawsuits within four years of the discovery of an. Iowa Code Ann. §§ 614.8A which apply to all cases in which injury occurred after July 1, 1990.
KansasKan. Stat. Ann. § 60-523 YesThe abused have three years from the age of 18 or three years from the date the victim realizes they have suffered an injury or illness caused by sexual abuse. The statute is expressly retroactive.
KentuckyKy. Rev. Stat. § 413.249 YesCivil actions for sexual abuse may be brought within five years of the last act of abuse, or within five years of the date, the victim’s discovery of the abuse or within five years after the victim reaches the age of 18.
LouisianaLa. Rev. Stat. § 9:2800.9. Yes§2800.9. Action against a person for abuse of a minor. A. An action against a person for sexual abuse of a minor, or for physical abuse of a minor resulting in permanent impairment or permanent physical injury or scarring, is subject to a liberative prescriptive period of 10 years. This prescription commences to run from the day the minor attains majority, and this prescription shall be suspended for all purposes until the minor reaches the age of majority.  Abuse has the same meaning as provided in Louisiana Children’s Code Article 603.  This prescriptive period shall be subject to any exception of preemption provided by law.

General discovery rule provides suit must be brought one year from date of discovery.

MaineMe. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 14, § 752-CYes-AnytimeCivil or criminal actions may be brought at any time.
MarylandMd. Cts. and Jud. Proc. § 5-117Extending the statute of limitations for civil child sexual abuse actions to 7 years after the date that the victim attains the age of majority.
MassachusettsMass. Gen. Laws ch. 260, § 4C YesSection 4C. Actions of tort alleging the defendant sexually abused a minor shall be commenced within 35 years of the acts alleged to have caused an injury or condition or within seven years of the time the victim discovered or reasonably should have discovered that an emotional or psychological injury or condition was caused by said act, whichever period expires later; provided, however, that the time limit for commencement of an action under this section is tolled for a child until the child reaches eighteen years of age.
MichiganNone. No special statute. The general personal injury statute, § 600.5805 governs actions for childhood sexual abuse. Sec. 5805. (1) A person shall not bring or maintain an action to recover damages for injuries to persons or property unless, after the claim first accrued to the plaintiff or to someone through whom the plaintiff claims, the action is commenced within the periods of time prescribed by this section.
MinnesotaMinn. Stat. Ann. § 541.073  YesAction for damages based on personal injury caused by sexual abuse must originate within six years of the time the plaintiff knew or had reason to know that the injury was caused by sexual abuse.” If the victim is a minor, the six-year limitations begin to run one year after the plaintiff reaches 18 and would terminate at age 25.
MinnesotaMinn. Stat. Ann. § 541.073YesAn action for damages based on sexual abuse: (1) must be commenced within six years of the alleged sexual abuse in the case of alleged sexual abuse of an individual 18 years or older; (2) may be commenced at any time in the case of alleged sexual abuse of an individual under the age of 18, except as provided for in subdivision 4; and (3) must be commenced before the plaintiff is 24 years of age in a claim against a natural person alleged to have sexually abused a minor when that natural person was under 14 years of age.

Subd. 4. Vicarious liability or respondent superior claims. A claim for vicarious liability or liability under the doctrine of respondeat superior must be commenced within six years of the alleged sexual abuse, provided that if the plaintiff was under the age of 18 at the time of the alleged abuse, the claim must be commenced before the plaintiff is 24 years of age. This subdivision does not limit the availability of these claims under other law.

Subd. 5. Title. “Child Victims Act.” (a) This section is effective the day following final enactment. Except as provided in paragraph (b), this section applies to actions that were not time-barred before the effective date. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, in the case of alleged sexual abuse of an individual under the age of 18, if the action would otherwise be time-barred under a previous version of Minnesota Statutes, section 541.073, or other time limits, an action for damages against a person, as defined in Minnesota Statutes, section 541.073, subdivision, clause (2), may be commenced no later than three years following the effective date of this section. This paragraph does not apply to a claim for vicarious liability or respondent superior but does apply to other claims, including negligence. This paragraph applies to actions pending on or commenced on or after the effective date.

MississippiMiss. Code Ann. § 15-1-49

Miss. Code Ann. § 15-1-59

Miss. Code Ann. § 15-1-57

Mississippi victims must file their claims: within 3 years of the act constituting sexual abuse under § 15-1-49 within three years of attaining the age of majority under the “minor savings statute” under § 15-1-59, and within 3 years of the victim’s release from imprisonment under § 15-1-57.

The court has declined to apply the discovery statute to cases of delayed realization of the connection between the abuse and the victim’s psychological injury; however, the issue has not been presented in the context of extensive memory repression. The standards for proving fraudulent concealment of a claim are so high as to be impracticable.

MissouriMo. Rev. Stat. § 537.046YesCivil claims must be filed either within 5 years of the time the victim reaches age 18 or within 3 years from the date the victim discovers that physical or psychological injury was caused by abuse.
MontanaMont. Code § 27-2-216(a) YesClaim may bring three years after the act of childhood sexual abuse that is alleged to have caused the injury, or 3 years after the time of discovery or reasonably should have discovered that the injury was caused by the act of childhood sexual abuse.
NebraskaNeb. Rev. Stat. § 25-207None. There is no special statute of limitations for victims of child sexual abuse. Nebraska victims must file their cases as follows:

Within four years of the acts constituting abuse under the general tort SOL. (Neb. Rev. Stat. § 25-207); The statute of limitations is suspended for victims who were abused as minors until they reach the age of 21 (Neb. Rev. Stat. § 25-213), therefore, victims have the period of four years from attaining the age of 21 in which to institute legal action.

NevadaNev. Rev. Stat. § 11.215YesCivil claims within 10 years of age 18, or within 10 years of discovery that injury was caused by the abuse. No outside time limitation as long as clear and convincing evidence exists that the abuse occurred.
New HampshireN.H. Rev. Stat. § 508:4-9 YesA person, alleging to have been subjected to any offense under RSA 632-A, or an offense under RSA 639:2, who were under 18 years of age when the alleged offense occurred, may commence a personal action based on the incident within the later of:
I. Twelve years of the person’s eighteenth birthday; or
II. Three years of the time the plaintiff discovers, or in the exercise of reasonable diligence should have discovered, the injury and its causal relationship to the act or omission complained of.
New JerseyN.J. Stat. Ann. § 2A:61B-1  YesActions can be initiated within two years of the date of the “reasonable discovery” of the “injury and its causal relationship to the act of sexual abuse.”
New MexicoN.M. Code § 37-1-30 YesAction can be initiated by the victim’s 24th birthday, or three years from the date of discovery of abuse, or had reason to know of the childhood sexual abuse and that the abuse resulted in injury.
New YorkN.Y. Civil Prac. Law § 215

N.Y. Civil Prac. Law § 214

N.Y. Civil Prac. Law §213-c

YesIn New York, there is no extended statute of limitations for sexual abuse; however, if the abuse is treated as an intentional tort, New York’s SOL is one year. N.Y. Civil Prac. Law § 215. If the victim brings a claim against a church or school which administered the perpetrator, or any action that is based in negligence, rather than criminal behavior, the SOL is 3 years—N.Y. Civil Prac. Law § 214. New York adopted a special statute of limitations for victims of sexual crimes in 2006—N.Y. Civil Prac. Law §213-c. The statute provides that actions for civil damages for defined sexual crimes, including sexual abuse of a minor, may be brought within 5 years of the acts constituting the sexual offense.
North CarolinaN.C. Gen. Stat. § 1-52(16) YesGeneral discovery statute (N.C. Gen. Stat. § 1-52(16)(1993) and general incompetence tolling provision (§ 1-17(a)(1993).
North DakotaN.D. Cent. Code § 28-01-25.1

2015 SB 2331

28-01-25.1. Limitation on actions alleging childhood sexual abuse. Notwithstanding section 28-01-25, a claim for relief resulting from childhood sexual abuse must be commenced within ten years after the plaintiff knew or reasonably should have known that a potential claim exists resulting from alleged childhood sexual abuse. For purposes of this section, “childhood sexual abuse” means any act committed by the defendant against the plaintiff which occurred when the plaintiff was under 18 years of age and which would have been a violation of chapter 12.1-20 or 12.1-27.2. In a claim for relief under this section, the plaintiff is not required to establish which act in a continuous series of sexual abuse acts by the defendant caused the injury

SECTION 1. AMENDMENT. Section 28-01-25.1 of the North Dakota Century Code is amended and reenacted as follows: 28-01-25.1. Limitation on actions alleging childhood sexual abuse. Notwithstanding section 28-01-25, there is no limitation of the time within which a claim for relief resulting from childhood sexual abuse must be commenced.

OhioOhio Code § 2305.111(c) YesOhio’s Special Statute of Limitations for Childhood Sexual Abuse, Effective Aug. 3, 2006. The law gives victims 12 years from their age of majority to bring actions against their perpetrators.
OklahomaOkla. Stat. tit. 12, § 95 YesAction commenced two years of the last act, two years of age 18 or two years of discovery, through 20 years from age 18.
OregonOr. Rev. Stat. § 12.117YesClaims must be brought within six years of age 18, or three years of discovery of the injury and the abuse.
PennsylvaniaPa. Cons. Stat. tit. 42 § 5533(b) Yes, Minority TollingExtended Statute of Limitations (SOL) Section 5533(b) (2) of Title 42 of the Pennsylvania Consolidated Statutes is amended to provide a SOL of 12 years from the date of a victim reaching his or her age of majority (18). The act also provides, however, that the amendment to 42 Pa.C.S. § 5533(b) shall not be applied to revive an action that has been barred by an existing statute of limitations on the effective date of the act.
Rhode IslandR.I. Gen. Laws § 9-1-51 YesAdminister claims against non-perpetrators; actions must be brought within three years of accrual. Within seven years of the last act or discovery that the injury or illness was caused by the act.
South CarolinaS.C. Code Ann. § 15-3-555YesExtends the statute of limitations for civil claims six years after the person reaches 21 or three years from the time the victim realizes that their injuries are caused by child sexual abuse.
South DakotaS.D. Codified Laws § 26-10-25 YesWithin three years of the act or discovery that the injury was caused by the act.
TennesseeTenn. Code 28-3-104 and 28-1-106 Yes, Minority TollingThere is no specific statute of limitations for survivors of sexual abuse. General one year SOL. General minority tolling statute suspending the claim until the plaintiff reaches 18 available. Suit must then be brought within one year.

Tennessee Code Annotated, Section 40-2-101, is amended by adding the following language as a new subsection: (m) Notwithstanding subsection (b), prosecutions for any offense committed on or after July 1, 2016, that constitutes the offense of aggravated child abuse, or aggravated child neglect or endangerment, under§ 39-15-402, shall commence by the later of: (1) Ten (10) years after the child reaches eighteen (18) years of age; or (2) The time within which prosecution must be commenced pursuant to subsection (b).

TexasTex. Civ. Prac. & Rem. Code § 16.0045 YesFifteen-year statute of limitations for violation of Section 22.011, Penal Code sexual assault; or Section 22.021, Penal Code aggravated sexual assault. Majority tolling provision states that if the victim was a minor, the SOL does not begin to run until his/her 18th birthday.
UtahUtah Code § 78B-2-309

House Bill 2015-0277, Chapter 082

YesEffective 3/23/2015 78B-2-308. Civil actions for sexual abuse of a child. Eliminates the statute of limitations for civil actions for child sexual abuse. Provides that a victim of child sexual abuse may file a civil action at any time.
VermontVt. Stat. Ann. tit. 12, § 522 YesCivil action brought by any person for injury suffered as a result of childhood sexual abuse initiated within six years of the act, or six years of the time of discovery.
VirginiaVa. Code § 8.01-243 YesGeneral statute of limitation for injuries to the victim is two years after the time of the injury. If the person at the time of the injury is a minor, the two-year time period will commence once that person comes of age.

D. Every action for injury to the person, whatever the theory of recovery, resulting from sexual abuse occurring during the infancy or incapacity of the person as set forth in subdivision 6 of § 8.01-249 shall be brought within 20 years after the cause of action accrues.

WashingtonWash. Rev. Code § 4.16.340 YesClaims of action shall be commenced within three years of the act alleged to have caused the injury or condition; within three years of the time of discovery or reasonably should have discovered that the injury or condition was caused by abuse; or within three years of the time the victim discovered that the act caused the injury for which the claim is brought provided that the time limit for commencement of an action is tolled for a child until he/she reaches 18 years.
West VirginiaW. Va. Code § 55-2-15 YesThe burden is on the victim to demonstrate that he/she was prevented from knowing of the claim at the time of the injury by reason of fraudulent concealment, inability to comprehend the injury, or other extreme hardship. Mere ignorance of existence of cause of action or of identity of wrongdoer does not prevent running of statute of limitations. Nor can the discovery rule be used to extend past the 20-year statute of repose.
WisconsinWis. Stat. § 893.587 YesClaim may be filed two years of reaching age of majority.
WyomingWyo. Stat. § 1-3-105 YesAction for childhood sexual abuse may be brought eight years after victims eighteenth birthday or three years after the time of discovery.

How to Report Sexual Abuse in your Church or Dioceses

If you suspect any form of sexual abuse in a church or your local dioceses, you may report them by calling us at 1-800-214-1010, all calls are handled with the utmost privacy.

If you are a clergy sexual abuse victim and need a support group we recommend the tremendous work done by The SNAP Network.  Please visit their website at: http://www.snapnetwork.org

Who is SNAP?  Here is their mission statement:

Today SNAP is the largest, oldest and most active self-help group for clergy sex abuse victims, whether assaulted by ministers, priests, nuns or rabbis. SNAP is a confidential, safe place for wounded men and women to be heard, supported and healed. SNAP works tirelessly to achieve two goals: to heal the wounded and to protect the vulnerable. The organization has more than 25,000 members and support groups meet in over 60 cities across the U.S. and the world.

Were you abused by a trusted church member, or know a victim?  Contact us by calling 1-800-214-1010 or use the secure contact form at the bottom of this page.  Take Action Now and help prevent more clerical abuse in churches and houses of worship.

Sources:

http://www.ncsl.org/research/human-services/state-civil-statutes-of-limitations-in-child-sexua.aspx

https://www.rainn.org/state-state-guide-statutes-limitations