Omontys

Omontys lawsuit on anaphylactic shock side effects, attorneys ready to file your claim in 2014

Omontys Attorneys for Lawsuit Claims The kidneys are obviously vitally important for our health and overall viability.  They serve the very important function of flushing the toxins out of our bodies so that they cannot remain inside of us and inflict harm.  Millions of people suffer from some sort of kidney problem that ultimately requires dialysis.  Dialysis is basically a ‘manual override’ such that a machine performs the functions of working kidneys to take care of that waste removal problem for people.  While kidney dialysis saves lives, it also comes with some risks and in some cases some costs.

One of those costs for many patients is anemia.  Anemia is a common byproduct of kidney dialysis, and people who suffer from anemia need medication in order to restore health to their circulatory systems.  One popular medication that was used to help people in this difficult position was known as Omontys, which was manufactured by Affymax, Inc. and Takeda Pharmaceuticals.  Unfortunately, allegations of serious Omontys side effects eventually began to surface, and these side effects ultimately led to an Omontys recall.  Below is a brief overview of this situation.

Omontys – A Brief Description

Omontys was approved for use in the United States by the FDA in 2012.  It was supposed to work by making use of its active ingredient, which was known as peginesatide.  This substance basically replaced the work that was supposed to be done by a hormone that naturally occurs in the body known as erythropoietin, as this is a hormone that stimulates the growth of red blood cells.  Clearly, adding red blood cells to the circulatory system is of great benefit to those with anemia.

Allegations of Omontys Side Effects

It wasn’t long before allegations of ominous Omontys side effects began to emerge.  The most troubling side effect was a serious allergic reaction to the drug known as anaphylactic shock.  Anaphylactic shock is a sudden, fast-moving and total body reaction to something, and common examples of anaphylactic shock include the way that some people react to bee stings or most people react to the venom of poisonous snakes when bitten.

Of course, people are at least somewhat ready to deal with this emergency if they are bitten by a snake, but when they are taking anemia medication they are most likely not expecting a fight for their lives.  Early symptoms of anaphylactic shock include:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Hives
  • Skin redness
  • Wheezing
  • Abnormal breathing sounds

Several people allegedly died from anaphylactic shock after using Omontys, and as a result the medication was recalled in the United States in order to prevent the possibility of additional deaths from occurring.

However, that doesn’t mean that everyone who was harmed by this drug has had an opportunity to stand up and protect his or her legal rights.  If you or someone you love has suffered in this manner, contact the Omontys side effects lawyers at the Hood National Law Group, today to schedule a free initial consultation.

Questions & Answers About Omontys

What is Omontys used for?

Omontys is an intravenous medication which is used to treat anemia. It has been approved to treat anemia in patients with end-stage kidney failure who are undergoing hemodialysis. 

What are the side effects of taking Omontys?

Complications that may be caused by Omontys are:

  • Abdominal or stomach pain
  • Blurred vision
  • Body aches
  • Confusion
  • Irregular heartbeat

Was there a recall for Omontys?

In February 2013, the FDA issued a press release announcing that the manufacturer would be recalling Omontys nationwide. The recall was voluntary, with the FDA warning: 

“Due to the severity of the public health risk, we want to be certain that health care providers stop using Omontys,” said Howard Sklamberg, director, Office of Compliance, FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Americans deserve medications that are safe, effective, and of the highest quality. We are investigating the products and facilities associated with this recall and will provide updates as we learn more.

Has there been any update in the Omontys lawsuit?

In July 2014, Affymax paid $6.5 million to settle a class action lawsuit filed by investors who accused the company of misleading about the risks of Omontys. By the time the FDA issued the recall, there had already been nearly 98 reports of adverse events, including 12 deaths. 

Omontys Lawsuits in these States:

Alabama (AL), Alaska (AK), Arizona (AZ), Arkansas (AR), California (CA), Colorado (CO), Connecticut (CT), Delaware (DE), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Hawaii (HI), Idaho (ID), Illinois (IL), Indiana (IN), Iowa (IA), Kansas (KS), Kentucky (KY), Louisiana (LA), Maine (ME), Maryland (MD), Massachusetts (MA), Michigan (MI), Minnesota (MN), Mississippi (MS), Missouri (MO), Montana (MT), Nebraska (NE), Nevada (NV), New Hampshire (NH), New Jersey (NJ), New Mexico (NM), New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), North Dakota (ND), Ohio(OH), Oklahoma (OK), Oregon (OR), Pennsylvania (PA), Rhode Island (RI), South Carolina (SC), South Dakota (SD), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), Utah (UT), Vermont (VT), Virginia (VI), Washington (WA), Washington DC (DC), West Virginia (WV), Wisconsin (WI), Wyoming (WY)

Our lawyers and attorneys can provide information on how to file Omontys lawsuits in the following cities: New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Detroit, Indianapolis, Columbus, Baltimore, Boston, Seattle, Washington, Milwaukee, Denver, Louisville, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Nashville, Oklahoma City, Portland, Phoenix, Houston, Tucson, Albuquerque, Atlanta, San Antonio, San Diego, San Francisco, Dallas, Colorado Springs, Arlington, Wichita, Long Beach, Fresno, Sacramento, Mesa, Kansas City, Cleveland, San Jose, Jacksonville, Austin, Memphis, Fort Worth, Charlotte, Virginia Beach, Omaha, Miami, Oakland, Tulsa, Honolulu, Minneapolis.

Omontys class action lawsuit for anaphylactic shock side effects page updated June 05, 2015